“Creo que el hombre aprende más del dolor y la adversidad que de los logros y las cosas fáciles”

— Pepe Mujica

34 EUR of taxes and “formalities” for a 25 USD product ... this system is so fucked up

“A un _gentleman_ sólo pueden interesarle causas perdidas...”

— La forma de la espada, J.L.B.

"When I picture it in my head I think of the early web as more of a library. Over time it has transitioned into a shopping mall." - chris_f (via HN)

Do you use them for something sourcehut related or for personal use?

Laura will be talking about “using the web for social good” at 18:00 UK/Irish time on Hey! Live.

Free to attend.

eventbrite.co.uk/e/hey-live-us

No more home office starting today. Im partly happy because things are starting to feel “normal” post and I’m glad to see my colleagues but I hope at least some companies takes this opportunity to offer partial or full-time remote to their workers. The pandemic might be under control but going back to “normal” is just going to kill our planet.

@j1mc @sir The other problem is one of scale. Programmers feel like they're allowed to create things that Might Not Work because a) they don't value their craft and b) the worst case that they can think of is that it will segfault.

The first one is a problem with how the craft is obtained. You're not going to value something that you learned in a month at a bootcamp, you can't appreciate anything about the actual Craft of it at that level yet, because you haven't grown the lenses appropriate. People spend like, the entirety of their lives growing up seeing Good Art, so by the time they come to do artwork, they have a model of what's appropriate. When you start programming that's almost always the first time you've seen code, there isn't that run-up period that allows you to discern what is and isn't Good Code.

The second one is a problem with scale. The craft of programming is so removed from the effects, that you can't accurately understand what the effects will be. The solution here is teaching, and accountability. Civil Engineers know that if they build something that fails, people will very likely die, and they, personally, will be inspected. Programmers need to be taught that if they fuck up, not only will they caused a lot of stress (Which honestly, is underappreciated in our current Zeitgeist), and time-loss, but they will likely cause environmental damage (Because of the sheer fucking heat and power that are used and put out by server farms), and they can ruin people's lives (Bad notification times have social consequences on people's social groups and also mental state).

But teaching isn't enough. Because programming is most of the time used in building products, and the rotation period of employees is very short, not to mention that so many people touch a codebase during it's development, it's impossible to develop an accurate idea of what you should be accountable for. It's a firing squad mentality, where nobody knows if the bullet that they shot caused someone to die. You cannot have any sort of accountability in that environment.

Listening to Vilma Palma e Vampiros. This is one of the bands I always come back to. The first time I heard them was in 1992 in a trip visiting my cousins in Asunción, Paraguay

Really good movie, will watch it again and will recommend others to watch it

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Funny movie, wouldn’t watch it again though

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